Q Art Gallery opened its new branch at the recently launched Shangri-La Mall on July 22 with the group exhibition “Art Vision”.

During the gallery’s opening ceremony, General Director of Q Art Gallery J.Bat-Undar said, “Q Art Gallery has been cooperating with artists and art lovers since 2012. We have been organizing charity and fundraising events, and supporting and promoting artists since our establishment. This time, we’ve opened our new branch at Shangri-La Mall. I thought there must be an art gallery at Shangri-La because it is an entertainment and shopping center.”

“Art Vision” was curated by the International Association of Mongol-origin Artists and Creators (IAMAC), an organization founded by Q Art Gallery, and brings together artists of Mongol-origin who live around the world and are united in a vision for the development of Mongolian art.

The mission of IAMAC is to promote Mongolian art around the world; to bring together artists, creators, critics, sponsors, collectors, and art connoisseurs of Mongol origin; to integrate the voices of Mongols and all Mongolian art supporters around the world; and to make contributions to the development of the art of Mongols.

The participating 12 artists living and studying abroad include S.Zayasaikhan (Japan), B.Otgontuvden (Russia), photographer B.Bat-Orgil (Russia), post modern artist Kh.Ariunzaya (Kazakhstan), M.Ganbold (Australia), graphic artist G.Zazaa (Germany), and illustrator Kh.Suren (Italy). They are displaying over 30 abstract, surrealist, and modern artworks in the exhibition.

The following are brief interviews with two of the participating artists.

Artist S.Zayasaikhan

 You recently had a solo exhibition in Ulaanbaatar comprised of 22 artworks. Why did you choose your work “Survivors” for display in “Art Vision”?

 This work’s composition is similar to Ulaanbaatar. Ulaanbaatar residents can’t breathe fresh air during the wintertime. I depicted the smoke of Ulaanbaatar through a mask.

When do you go back to Japan and what are you planning to do when you get there?

 I will create more artwork. I like to do my work according to a plan. We have to make plans because time is very important.

All of your artwork is very flamboyant and uses bright colors. You use new content and concepts in your artwork. Where do you find new ideas?

 Ideas are everywhere. I take ideas from everything: traditional Mongolian women’s garments, myths, songs, and films. The important thing is how to express an idea through painting.

Are you a Mongol zurag (traditional Mongolian painting) style painter or a fine art painter?

 I am a fine artist because the world is globalizing, so it is very hard to say that one thing is related to only one country. For example, an American child could come to Mongolia and create artwork about Mongolians in Mongol zurag style. After that, there would be debate about whether or not the work would be considered Mongolian traditional artwork.

What’s the difference between exhibitions you seen abroad and exhibitions in Mongolia?

 I think Mongolian artists’ exhibitions are at a very good level. In my opinion, Mongolian artists are creating more realistic artworks very well these days. Viewers also like to see realistic work.

Artist Kh.Suren  

You displayed so much work in the exhibition. What did you try to say through your artwork?

My works displayed in “Art Vision” are my thesis works. You can see Mongolian folktales, memories of my father, elements of thangka painting, and embroidery in my work.

I lost a number of people in my life when I was studying in Italy. Those people are always alive in my heart, because I wasn’t in Mongolia when they passed away. That’s why I created these works, to remember them. The work that depicts a toono (the center ring of a Mongol ger) and a fox is dedicated to my father. Every father makes a felt fox, a Mongolian version of a dreamcatcher, when their children are born.

I took ideas from Mongolian folktales to create the other four artworks.

“Dream 1” by Kh.Suren
“Dream 2”
“Dream 3”
“Dream 4” 
“Dream 5”